Charles Dickens í 200 ár

Laugardagur 10. mars kl. 13-16.30
Stofa 225 í Aðalbyggingu Háskóla Íslands

Málstofa í tilefni af stórafmæli sagnaskáldsins. Haldin verða fjögur erindi
þar sem fjallað verður um sögulegt vægi Dickens, alþjóðlega og á Íslandi, um þær tvær sögulegu skáldsögur sem eftir hann liggja, og um leikræna túlkun, í sögu kvikmyndanna, á einni þekktustu persónu sem höfundurinn skapaði.

Málstofan fer fram á ensku. Aðalfyrirlesari og jafnframt sérstakur gestur
Hugvísindastofnunar er prófessor Michael Hollington sem hefur fjallað mikið um verk Dickens.

Fyrirlesarar:

  • Michael Hollington, prófessor í ensku við háskólann í Toulouse-Le
    Marail 2: Dickens in Europe
  • Martin Regal, dósent í ensku: Playful Anti-Semitism? Images of Fagin from 1909 to the Present
  • Ingibjörg Ágústsdóttir, lektor í ensku: „How warped and perverted all things good by nature were become“: Charles Dickens‘s Historical Fiction
  • Ástráður Eysteinsson, prófessor í bókmenntum: The Tale and the Toothpick. On Dickens in Iceland

Málstofustjóri: Júlían Meldon D'Arcy prófessor

Útdrættir

Michael Hollington, prófessor í ensku við háskólann í Toulouse-Le
Marail 2
Dickens in Europe

A broad view will be presented of Charles Dickens‘ place in European literature, emphasizing the ways in which he has been shaped to fit in with particular dominant figures or forms in the various native traditions. The talk will also focus on Dickens‘s impact on other key novelists, including Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. 

 

Martin Regal, dósent í ensku
Playful Anti-Semitism? Images of Fagin from 1909 to the Present

Dickens’ Fagin been misrepresented on film since his first appearance in 1909. In the early part of the 20th century he was demonized and caricatured but since the 1960s he has gradually become more and more sympathetic. This short paper looks at the rationale behind this change and how individual actors have responded to the challenge of interpreting one of Dickens’ most memorable characters.

 

Ingibjörg Ágústsdóttir, lektor í ensku
„How warped and perverted all things good by nature were become“: Charles Dickens‘s Historical Fiction

Charles Dickens wrote two historical novels: Barnaby Rudge (1841) and A Tale of Two Cities (1859). Both novels are set in times of revolution, namely the Gordon Riots, which took place in London in 1780, and the French Revolution. In both historical novels, Dickens portrays the build up to and consequences of revolution, focusing specifically on the rioting and mob violence that became its inescapable bedfellows. While both texts clearly condemn the violence portrayed, they also criticise what Dickens saw as the causes behind such violence: social inequality, brutal oppression, political injustice and the blindness of the ruling classes to the misery and degradation of the poor.

This paper discusses Dickens as a historical novelist, examining the ways in which he approaches and uses history in the two aforementioned novels. It argues that Dickens’s engagement with the French Revolution in A Tale of Two Cities conveys a much stronger and more effective message on social oppression, injustice and political disempowerment than that established through Barnaby Rudge. Moreover, the paper will address the question of to what extent Dickens can be said to follow the model for the historical novel, as established by Sir Walter Scott in Waverley (1814) and later defined by Georg Lukács.

 

Ástráður Eysteinsson, prófessor í bókmenntum
The Tale and the Toothpick. On Dickens in Iceland

A quick overview will be given of the Dickens reception in Iceland, ranging from translated works to critical dicussions to journalistic commentary. The main focus will be on the roles and places assigned to Dickens in Icelandic literary culture, as reflected in the choices and manipulations of texts translated, and in the general presentation of the author and his body of work.   

 

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