Íslenskan og enskan í návígi – enska sem samskiptamál á Íslandi

Föstudagur 25. mars kl. 13.00-16.30 í stofu 222 í Aðalbyggingu Háskólans.

Í þessari málstofu verða kynntar frumniðurstöður rannsóknarinnar „Enska sem samskiptamál í breyttu málumhverfi“. Rannsóknin er styrkt af RANNÍS með þátttöku þúsunda Íslendinga. Fyrirlesarar fjalla um viðhorf barna, unglinga og fullorðinna til eigin enskunotkunar og velt verður upp spurningum um áhrif návígis ensku og íslensku á mál og málnotkun á Íslandi.

Fyrirlestrar verða fluttir á ensku en hægt er að taka þátt í umræðum á íslensku.

Málstofustjóri: Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir, prófessor í annarsmálsfræðum

 

Fyrirlesarar:

  • Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir, prófessor í annarsmálsfræðum: English and Icelandic in Academia: A Matter of Language Policy
  • Hulda Kristín Jónsdóttir, doktorsnemi í ensku: To what extent do Icelanders believe that their English proficiency meets their daily communication needs within the business environment?
  • Anna Jeeves, doktorsnemi og aðjunkt í ensku: The „English Self“ of young Icelanders today

Kaffihlé

  • Samuel Lefever, dósent við Menntavísindasvið: Transition from primary to secondary level – student’s attitudes towards ELT
  • Ásrún Jóhannsdóttir, doktorsnemi í ensku: The L2 External Influence Model: 4th grade English Users in Iceland
  • Pétur Knútsson, dósent í ensku máli: Ordination and sentence accent: a reappraisal

 

Útdrættir:

 

Birna Arnbjörnsdóttir, prófessor í annarsmálsfræðum
English and Icelandic in Academia: A Matter of Language Policy 

The use of English in academia throughout the world has increased during the last few decades. One manifestation of this is the increased pressure on researchers to publish in competitive journals. This usually means publishing in English. The same applies to researchers at the University of Iceland where advancement depends on, and more research points are awarded for, publications in international journals. Until now the extent of scholarly writing in English by Icelandic researchers has not been readily available, nor their views on their preparation and actual use of English. In this talk, the results of surveys of faculty and students at the University of Iceland will be presented. The surveys examined participants‘ view about their English preparation and use in teaching, learning and scholarship. This will be followed by a discussion on the general status of English as an academic language at the University of Iceland, and finally, its affect on the status of Icelandic as a language of science.

 

Hulda Kristín Jónsdóttir, doktorsnemi í ensku
To what extent do Icelanders believe that their English proficiency meets their daily communication needs within the business environment? 

A self efficacy/usage questionnaire has been made available to a number of Icelandic corporations with the intention of gathering data on English usage, confidence levels in English usage, current trends in English usage in the business environment and in order to gain more insight as to the current climate in the Icelandic business environment as a whole. The research questions focus primarily on business communication and the survey requests information at both a ‘personal’ and ‘institutional’ level so that the data may be utilised for both my doctoral thesis and as part of the larger project “English as a Lingua Franca in Iceland.” The survey hopes to include 300 NNS participants from various fields within the Icelandic labour market, specifically within industry, banking, medical, the travel industry, academia, ICT and energy. The extended survey would represent a 0.18% proportion of the working population in Iceland and I would like to present the data gathered so far.

 

Anna Jeeves, doktorsnemi og aðjunkt í ensku
The „English Self“ of young Icelanders today

The research as a whole explores the perceived needs and relevance of English and English studies to the lives of young Icelanders, with respect to study, employment, and everyday life. Through qualitative data from interviews with school and university students and employees, young Icelanders' use of English as a „lingua franca“ in the changing linguistic environment of Iceland today is being mapped out.

The proposed talk focuses on young Icelanders’ self-image as users of English within the context of Iceland. The „English Self“ is concerned with participants‘ perceptions of English as essential to their lives, and with the belief expressed by some that not knowing English would limit their participation in Icelandic society.

 

Samuel Lefever, dósent við Menntavísindasvið
Transition from primary to secondary level – student’s attitudes towards ELT

The aims of this study were to identify classroom practices and other factors that contribute to effective teaching and learning of English from the perspectives of the learners and whether there is a mismatch between teaching objectives and students’ perceived needs. Students in their final year of compulsory school from 20 schools across the nation were given a questionnaire which surveyed their attitudes towards the teaching and learning methods and materials used in English instruction. Students were also asked to comment on their use of English outside of school. The study is part of a larger research study which is investigating the changing status of English in Icelandic society.

 

Ásrún Jóhannsdóttir, doktorsnemi í ensku
The L2 External Influence Model: 4th grade English Users in Iceland

The focus of this study is to explore 4th grade students’ attitude towards English and the contributing factors that affect their motivation and vocabulary attainment at the beginning of formal instruction. In this lecture, I will present the final stages and results from a survey of their motivation and attitude. The results will be examined with a “L2 External Influence Model” designed by the author. The model focuses on five external factors (peer, family, media and school influence plus current and future needs). These factors are explored through the three different stages of motivation (the ideal self, ought-to-self and the L2 environment) presented by Dörnyei (2005) in his “The L2 Motivational Self System”.

 

Pétur Knútsson, dósent í ensku máli
Ordination and sentence accent: a reappraisal

In my paper on ‘Ordination and sentence accent’ at Hugvísindaþing 2010 I suggested a connection between Icelandic appositive ‘en’ and Icelandic reaccenting, but my formulation was in some ways unsatisfactory. I now suggest that by taking intonation as a primitive, and assuming that subordination occurs in the intonation pattern prior to its realisation in syntax, we can explain English deaccenting, Icelandic reaccenting, appositive Icelandic ‘en’, Icelandic comma splicing, and possibly other peculiarities of Icelandic English, all in one foul swoop.

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